Monthly Archives: June 2013

Are Women and Girls Really More At Risk For ACL Injuries?

We’ve been getting questions lately from some of our more active female patients about whether or not they should worry more about anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries because of their gender and their propensity for “high-risk” sports like skiing or soccer.  The answer it seems is yes…and no.  Last year, the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery*(JBJS), published a study where they compared MRI scans of male and female athletes with non-contact ACL injuries with athletes who participated in similar sports, but did not sustain injury to their ACLs.  What they found was that the common factor between those who sustained injury wasn’t gender, it was geometry.

Here’s how an February 2012 article published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons** described it:

The ACL is a ligament that runs through, and stabilizes, the middle of the knee joint. While the ACL can be injured through contact, it is most commonly strained or torn without contact, when a person suddenly changes direction, stops abruptly or lands incorrectly after a jump, such as in soccer, basketball and skiing.

The study found that most of the women (those who had ACL injuries and those who did not) and only the ACL-injured men shared a common geometry on the outside of their knee joint: The upper part of their shin bone at the joint (tibial plateau) was much shorter and more rounded. This may help to explain why women have an ACL injury rate that is two-to-five times greater than that of men.

“A lot of people who have ACL tears have a high degree of laxity (loose ligaments) in their knee joints,” said Christopher J. Wahl, MD, the study’s lead author and an orthopaedic surgeon and team physician in the Department of […]

Beware of Herbal Supplements if You’re Having Surgery

It’s not unusual to see patients in our practice taking herbal supplements.  We don’t weigh in one way or another on the efficacy of “natural” vitamins and supplements but we do caution our patients who are considering having a surgical procedure done against taking them prior to and after their surgery.

While every patient experience is different, what many may not realize is that these supplements may cause abnormal blood pressure, heart rates, and bleeding.  They may also interfere with other medications, including anesthesia during your surgery.

We generally recommend to our patients that they disclose any “over-the-counter” medication they are taking (including aspirin, herbs, vitamins and dietary supplements) to their physician.  We also ask patients to stop taking them one week prior to surgery to reduce their risk of excessive bleeding, or negative interactions with other medications that we prescribe to treat orthopaedic problems and manage pain.

Not sure if your supplement may be a problem?  Here’s a list of common herbal supplements that we recommend against:

  Dong Quai
  Gingko Biloba
  Ginger
  Ginseng
  White Willow Bark (salix alba)
  Devil’s Claw (harpagophytum procumbens)
  Turmeric (curcuma longa)
  Boswellia (bosellia serrata)
  Stinging Nettle (urtica dioica)
  Cat’s Claw (uncaria tomentosa)
  Quercetin
  Reservatrol
  Cayenne
  Omega-3 FA
  St. John’s Wort

If you’re a patient and have questions about how a supplement you may be taking may interact with your prescribed medication, please contact our office.