Arms & Elbows

Using Diet to Reduce Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms

In recent years, you may have heard discussions or read articles about “inflammation” in the body and its connection to autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, and psoriasis. “Inflammation” is a real issue for many of our patients, especially those who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, a condition we see quite frequently where the patient’s overactive immune system is attacking his or her joints, causing pain. Anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressing medications can and are often used to treat such conditions. However, a patient’s diet can also play a part in reducing inflammation in the body.

A growing number of nutritional and medical experts suggest that a body’s autoimmunity problems are caused by tiny holes in the gut that allow particles of food, bacteria and other substances from inside the intestines to escape into the rest of the body. This is important because a “leaky gut”, and more specifically, an invasion of foreign substances into the body, can trigger the body to respond by producing inflammation – the same process used to fight any other bacterial infection. Over time, that chronic inflammation can cause tissue damage, resulting in an autoimmune disease such as the ones listed above.

Enter the Paleo autoimmune protocol (a stricter version of the more popular Paleo Diet). The Paleo autoimmune protocol seeks to seal the holes in the gut wall by eliminating the foods thought to cause them, namely:

Processed, fried and high fat foods (especially those that contain high amounts of salt, preservatives, additives, or sugar)
Alcohol
Breads & Grains (including whole and heritage grains)
Potatoes
Legumes
Dairy
Eggs
Nightshade vegetables such as tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers
Nuts and seeds
Certain spices such as curries, paprika and chili powder
Refined sugar

Those who follow this protocol typically eliminate the trigger foods mentioned above for […]

Beware of Herbal Supplements if You’re Having Surgery

It’s not unusual to see patients in our practice taking herbal supplements.  We don’t weigh in one way or another on the efficacy of “natural” vitamins and supplements but we do caution our patients who are considering having a surgical procedure done against taking them prior to and after their surgery.

While every patient experience is different, what many may not realize is that these supplements may cause abnormal blood pressure, heart rates, and bleeding.  They may also interfere with other medications, including anesthesia during your surgery.

We generally recommend to our patients that they disclose any “over-the-counter” medication they are taking (including aspirin, herbs, vitamins and dietary supplements) to their physician.  We also ask patients to stop taking them one week prior to surgery to reduce their risk of excessive bleeding, or negative interactions with other medications that we prescribe to treat orthopaedic problems and manage pain.

Not sure if your supplement may be a problem?  Here’s a list of common herbal supplements that we recommend against:

  Dong Quai
  Gingko Biloba
  Ginger
  Ginseng
  White Willow Bark (salix alba)
  Devil’s Claw (harpagophytum procumbens)
  Turmeric (curcuma longa)
  Boswellia (bosellia serrata)
  Stinging Nettle (urtica dioica)
  Cat’s Claw (uncaria tomentosa)
  Quercetin
  Reservatrol
  Cayenne
  Omega-3 FA
  St. John’s Wort

If you’re a patient and have questions about how a supplement you may be taking may interact with your prescribed medication, please contact our office.